Monday Outfit: E & E Ponderosa + (Slightly Modified) Hemlock

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Good morning! Any time Heidi of Elegance & Elephants asks me if I’d like to try out her patterns, it’s an automatic yes. Her designs are comfortable and stylish and the kind of garments that K actually wants to wear.

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“OH MY GOSH I LOVE IT,” is what K said when I presented her the Ponderosa dress. I’m a fan of the chartreuse double-knit combined with the muted bold stripes, and K is a fangirl too.

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The only part I didn’t follow exactly was the neckband attachment. I used my regular method of folding the band in half initially and sewing to the neck opening, then simply overlocking the raw edges.

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Do you like the pink shades? They are actually Nancy Drew stealth spyglasses — ordered via Scholastic Books — and it comes with an earpiece to enable eavesdropping. You have to stand right next to the people conversing to hear anything which renders the stealth part moot, but it’s been a major hit around here.

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The pattern is fantastic. Super easy to construct and the size 8 is spot-on for K. As you can see, I played with the stripes a bit, and the skirt is cross-grain so it might stretch out. That’s okay though — too long is always better than too short. This one is going to get a lot of love.

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Heidi generously provided me all three of her new patterns (Ponderosa Dress, Hemlock Top, Magnolia Skirt) and I had every intention to sew up all of them. Sadly, I could only manage the dress and top, but but two out of three ain’t bad.

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Some of you may recognize the tee fabric from my Skippy Dress. I had just barely enough left for the Hemlock top, and K was over the moon since she’s been coveting my dress fabric for some time. “Why do you always use the prettiest fabric for your own clothes, Mommy?” is a common phrase around here.

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I started sewing the top late at night, and I misread the instructions. This led to me basting the flutters with a zig zag stitch instead of a long basting stitch so I couldn’t gather the flutters. I abhor ripping out zig zag stitches from knits — thus, I decided to make them unfluttery flutters instead. A bit Star Trek, perhaps? The knits are all from here. Such a great little shop and the owner is so, so sweet.

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To me, it actually looks very hipster and I’m loving it. No idea what she’s doing up there.

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Again, K is smitten (for a while she refused to wear a lot of what I was making, so these recent approvals are heartwarming). Huzzah!

Good news: Heidi’s patterns are on sale ($1 off) with the coupon code TOUR until October 24th! Check out the shop here!

P.S. I’ll be posting on Thursday instead of Wednesday this week.

P.P.S. I finally took the plunge and gave K the book. Guess what she said? “I already know this, Mama.”  All that hemming and hawing for nuthin’…I guess she was just confused about the DNA part.

Franklin Dress + Tunic

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Happy Friday! There’s a new player in the indie pattern circuit, and I was excited to be invited to try out Brooklyn Pattern’s brand new offering: The Franklin Dress. Erin, the creator, has such a fascinating background (circus, ballet and opera costume designer!) and because I worked in theater for a while, I feel a kinship with her.

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The Franklin dress has a vintage-inspired feel with a pleated yoke and puffy sleeves, and it actually reminds me of the many Japanese patterns I’ve pumped out to date. So obviously, I love the style. And when you pair a pretty pattern with an equally pretty polka dotted cotton, well…I’d call it a winner.

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We had a prop situation in that K kept wanting to try different ones, so I apologize that there are so many photos (and blurry ones!) in advance. She insisted that I include them all, and I am nothing if not an obliging parent. We started with a glass tchotchke shaped like a Hershey’s kiss.

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franklin-dress11Then we tried a gold clutch to match the vintage gold buttons on her yoke.

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And we can’t forget the Scholastic book order form.

But this was her favorite:

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I love those metal letters. The Robert Kaufman dotty chambray is from here, and it’s the softest, loveliest cotton. I cut a size 8 for K, and it’s a little long, but I don’t mind. I read through the instructions which were pretty clear (but maybe some steps were missing?). However, I find that I like to do things my own way these days, and I didn’t set in the sleeves but used my usual cheater method; I also basted the yoke and facing together to keep things tidy as I sewed. All in all, the whole dress came together easily. One other thing you may or may not have noticed…my pleats are facing outward instead of inward and this was purely my personal preference. Sometimes I get nitpicky about stuff like that.

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And hey, why stop at just sewing the dress? I felt like a dose of color was in order, and wanted to see how quickly I’d be able to sew this if I eliminated the pleats as well as the pockets (which are part of the black dress, but I couldn’t get good shots of her showing them off), shortened the sleeves and made it into a tunic. Can you guess? 1 hour and 44 minutes. I was a speedster because I only had an hour and forty-five minutes before I had to go pick up K. Got it done in the nick of time.

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I’m not sure how long the black dress took. I did a rare thing and worked on it little by little over a four-day period — I never do this, because I’m impatient and want to get it all done in one fell swoop. It was actually super stress-free and very enjoyable. It was fun to speed sew this tunic too, though.

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I’m liking the Franklin pattern! Oh, the cute apple fabric was K’s find. Perfect for fall!

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K made that necklace out of buttons she filched from my stash. She got sort of psychobabbly with her interpretation of what each button meant: “The green turtle is for envy, the purple is for magical emotions, the pink elephant is for happiness…”

Anyway. Erin is offering a giveaway! Here’s the Rafflecopter snazziness, and it sounds as though you might need to “like” her facebook page? That world is a mystery to me. If you’d like to enter the giveaway, here it is:
a Rafflecopter giveaway

I’ve inundated you with enough words and images for today so I’ll bid you adieu and am wishing you a wonderful weekend!

Cashew Milk

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As I grow older, I’ve noticed that I have a harder time digesting cow’s milk and end up with a bunch of weird reactions. In particular, my monthly PMS breakouts are worse and painfully cystic when I’ve consumed too many dairy products, so I’ve been trying to find tasty alternatives. I love soy and almond milk, but I’ve been reading about some scary additives (like carrageenan) and though I usually pshaw those types of hyped up warnings, I figure I should stay on the safe side.

A few weeks ago, when I was chatting with a friend, I noticed her swigging a creamy liquid that she kept shaking up. It turned out to be cashew milk, and I was intrigued. Cashews are my favorite nuts! Why didn’t I think of cashew milk before? Alas, the stuff is not readily available at even my uber granola, natural foods market.

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Did you know that it’s super easy to make cashew milk? This was a happy discovery as I had cashews and water on hand, and that’s all I needed! Using my trusty Vitamix (though any blender will do since cashews are softer than your average nut), I just blended one cup of cashews with 3 cups of water for about 40 seconds. Some recipes suggest soaking the raw nuts overnight, but I didn’t bother.

In fact, I didn’t even use raw cashews. I got the “less salty” kind from Trader Joe’s and the result was a thick, milky beverage that tastes like liquid cashew butter. Adding a sweetener would perhaps be advisable, but I actually like the slightly salty undertones. Action shot:

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I’m starting to feel like a televangelist for Trader Joe’s, but I seem to constantly have memorable experiences there. About a week ago, I was having a bummer of a day as it happens sometimes. I’d just placed all my grocery bags in my trunk sporting an Eeyore-esque expression, and was about to go return the cart, when a young man happened to be approaching from my right. He smiled pleasantly and said, “Here, let me take that for you,” and rolled my cart away to the designated area. He wasn’t an employee, and I was looking pretty unsexy (yoga pants, frizzy bun, no make-up, grumpy, cystic acne) so I wasn’t having a cougar moment or anything — he was just being nice. That tiny act of kindness completely lifted my bad mood, and I drove home hoping that K will grow up to be a considerate young adult like that.

But I was talking about cashew milk. It’s taking me a bit to get used to, but I really like it in my coffee as you can see below. I also made a cashew hot cocoa and that was definitely yum. And I bet cashew milk chai using my go-to recipe would be divine…it’s got potential, this one. Lots of potential.

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Sewing for Me: Wool Zip-Up Vest

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Good morning! Since I’ll be sharing a K-sized outfit on Friday this week, I thought I would change up the routine and post this wool vest I made a few days ago.

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I haven’t sewn much with wool, and this fabric is actually a polyester blend full of slubbiness and stretch. I’m not sure if that made it easier or not, but oh, the shedding…don’t get me started on the shedding. There is a thin layer of dark grey dust all over my sewing area at the moment, and it’s looking rather post-apocalyptic.

I have this Eddie Bauer wool feather-down vest that I wear all the time that I bought years and years ago. It’s starting to look pretty worn out, though, and I thought this pattern from Basic Black sewing book would create a decent substitute:

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Hmmm, I didn’t look at the modeled photo as I was sewing the vest but the styling must have embedded itself in my brain since I used a very  similar fabric and I even took photos wearing a braid. I usually try to stay away from direct copying, so this surprised me. At any rate, I ended up changing a few things from the original pattern and as usual, I didn’t execute flawlessly. Take a gander.

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Do you see it? The pockets are totally lopsided. They were actually even when I first attached them, but then as I tried to get the separating zipper inserted, one side started stretching out and the right front bodice piece ended up way longer. Next time, I will make sure to add interfacing or stay tape before attaching the zipper. Another note on the zipper: I think the instructions were incorrect? When I followed them to the letter, my zipper was facing the wrong way so I had to figure out a different method. It’s very likely to be user error, but I’ll be making this vest again so I’ll provide the correct way if the instructions are wrong.

I am debating whether or not to re-do the pockets, but you know what’s funny? Because I naturally stand with my right shoulder hiked up, the pockets actually look quite even when I’m wearing it. I guess I should consider attaching all my pockets askew…Anyhow, here are some of the changes I made. Instead of folding over the armhole inward to finish them, I cut out two 2″ bias bindings for the arm openings. Much, much cleaner in my opinion:

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My fabric was pretty bulky so instead of double-folding the hem, I serged it (lazy, lazy — look at that white serger thread) and folded up only once. I also added a couple of extra inches to the hem for my extra long torso:

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I wish the zipper tape showed more because it’s this cool black and white stripe, like this one, except mine separates.

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The design is great, though I should have used something other than the same fabric for the collar facing…I don’t like wool directly on my skin as a general rule, and though this one isn’t too bad, it’s still a bit scratchy.

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Imperfect, but totally functional. I’ll take it!

Happy Friday + Randomness

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Happy Friday! “Mama?” K asked the other day, “How is it that I have both your DNA and Daddy’s DNA? I don’t get it.” I gulped. At her eight-year wellness check during the summer, our pediatrician warned me that the questions will start. Not MY little girl, I thought smugly, I still have all the time in the world. But here we are, just two months after the warning, and K has been peppering me with some variation of this question almost every day.

So I ordered a book recommended by the pediatrician. Because let’s face it, I know myself and I will end up using weird, untechnical cute-sounding terminology (e.g. “weenis”) and completely botch up the explanation. I am utterly unprepared and unqualified for sex education for kids. My parents never even tried to broach the topic with me. I remember when I was about 11 and had some vague notion of reproduction, I genuinely wondered whether people took off their underwear. A German friend tells me that it’s such a non-issue in her native country, kids know all about the birds and the bees practically from birth. Ditto with a Dutch friend. It makes me want to move to Europe to soak in that blase attitude toward a subject that causes me to squirm when discussed publicly (being of Asian-descent raised by immigrant parents in the US exacerbates this, I think — I have never seen my parents hug, much less kiss. In their homeland, people bow to each other and celibacy is a hip and happening trend, for crying out loud).

The book arrived yesterday so I’m working up the courage to go through it with K this weekend. So awkward. Then again, if you think I’m bad, you should see M. He won’t touch the topic with a 1000-foot pole and has insisted I would be better at enlightening K. He’s got German roots so I don’t know what his excuse is.

Anyway. I’m subsisting on cough drops to avoid the usual bronchial infection I tend to get with every cold and I’m going to go binge-watch Game of Thrones season 3 (thanks for reminding me of the show, Greta!) as I build up my nerve to dive into the it’s-not-the-stork story with K.

Oh, the winner of the giveaway is Lacey, who studied linguistics. Congrats! I absolutely loved reading everyone’s favorite classes, areas of study, etc. So fun!

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Have an un-awkward, relaxing weekend, all!

No Monday Outfit
We’re switching thing up next week
Stay tuned for Friday*

*I’m featuring a cool indie pattern on Friday – I think you’ll like it!

 

2014 Fall Sewing Plans

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It’s like clockwork. The frenetic start of the school year eases into a predictable routine, the air tingles with promises of cozy sweater weather, and then, M or K comes home with a cold and BAM, I’m laid flat on my back, sniffling and coughing up a lung. Due to my wimpy immune system, even the mildest cold tends to hit me hard.

I’m determined to not get sucked into the illness vortex this time (last year I was fighting one ailment after another from November to February), so I’ve been slowing things down dramatically. Yesterday, I did nothing. Okay, I dragged myself to Trader Joe’s and ran a couple of errands as I always do on Tuesdays, but otherwise, zilch. And yes, I drew that illustration, but that took less time than you would imagine. Alright, alright, I may have cut out a pattern that I thought I might be able to sew up for today, but I stopped myself from proceeding beyond tracing out the pieces when the world started spinning.

My mom told me during her last visit in August that when I was a baby, I would work so hard on everything that she used to worry that I had some kind of compulsive disorder. Take walking, for example. At 9 months, I was so intent on walking, I would go at it full force, fall flat on my face, turn a lurid and frightening shade of crimson, get up with renewed vigor and do it over. Sometimes I would fall backwards and hit my head and knock myself out. And yet, I would continue relentlessly and without breaks. It seems to explain a lot about my current spotty brain functionality. It also makes me wonder why my mom didn’t babyproof a little better if I was concussing myself on a regular basis.

You’d think that I would have mastered walking quicker than most due to my persistence, but my mom said she couldn’t believe how long it took me to get the hang of it (months). When my younger brother came along and casually sauntered a few days after his ninth month without much of a stumble, my fanatical determination seemed doubly worrisome to my mom. The funny thing is, my brother and I have approached everything in much the same way our whole lives — effortlessly for him, unglamorously full of prolonged effort for me.

I’m not sure what made me think of that; wandering thoughts may be a symptom of this head cold. Anyway, I did have enough energy to start planning my fall sewing in a more structured way. Unlike last year’s out-of-control plan that I didn’t even come close to executing, this year, I have only three sewing projects and one super easy knitting venture on the docket: A wool zip-up vest, a plaid shirt (a must for Fall, no?), a pair of skinny jeans and a (gasp) cashmere knitted scarf. I’m going for quality vs. quantity, folks. I know I poo-poo’d knitting before, but I think I can manage a big rectangle…at least I hope I can. I’ll be using this book for the vest, but I’m researching patterns for the others. I’ve gotten some good skinny jeans recs from the Monday post, and I’m digging deeper. I’ll update this post with pattern candidates later!

For now, I’m off to brew up some Indian spice herbal tea with a touch of manuka honey and almond milk and will call it a day.

Monday Outfit: Necessity Sewing

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Good morning! For over two years, I’ve been sewing K an outfit nearly every week. An important lesson from last year was that I failed to make her enough clothes that are appropriate for cooler weather. All my lovely linen creations and flimsy dresses sat unloved as temperatures dipped and poor K suffered through the rainy season (which, as you know in the Pacific Northwest, lasts forever) with nary a waterproof jacket.

I decided to rectify the situation this year and got some water-resistant nylon fabric for that specific purpose. Turning to my go-to book, I selected the “No Collar Coat” and added a hood from this coat’s pattern.
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It became clear why I’ve avoided making a raincoat: the fabric is a nightmare. You can’t really iron it all that well, you can’t pin it, and when you make a mistake, the stitches permanently puncture the material, as you can see in the hood here:

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Not only that, I slipped while cutting open a button hole, and momentarily thought I’d sliced through the whole coat — I nearly sobbed because this darn thing took so much work. Luckily, the damage was minimal and I was able to suture it decently enough and the button hides most of the ugliness.

I learned a few things from this coat:

- For nylon or nylon-esque material, use a microtex needle. Otherwise, the underside pokes through, which looks terrible when it’s white like mine. I switched needles after attaching the first pocket, and the difference was remarkable.
- Ironing is possible with a press cloth, but keep the iron at a pretty low setting if you don’t want the material to melt (I used my poly blend setting). Finger pressing is also helpful.
- For hand-sewn buttons, an extra sharp needle is highly recommended. It felt like I was trying to sew through cardboard with my less-than-sharp needle.

necessity-sewing2 necessity-sewing6This was a challenging project, but if you don’t look too closely, it’s quite professional-looking. In fact, M was so impressed, he asked me to make him a rain jacket too. He never asks me to make him anything and I so wanted to accommodate. I really did. However, I had to put my foot down and say no, because man, this was not a fun project.

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I love the way the hood looks with the coat, and I used a french seam to prevent unsightliness when the hood is down. The metal buttons look vintage, and are from my mom, and I can’t get enough of metal buttons. They work perfectly for the shoulder and sleeve tabs, I think, giving it a sort of militaristic feel.

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I’m happy to report that the long-sleeved tees and denim loose pants were a breeze. These are also from the same book, and the pants are actually supposed to have suspenders but K ixnayed them, saying they looked weird. Oh, and I added 8cm to the hem so she wouldn’t outgrow them too quickly.

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She’s besotted with both tees, though she complained that the pants are too baggy. I keep promising to make her skinny jeans, and am still looking for a good pattern. Not just for K, but for me as well…the search continues.

I’m a little fuzzy on where all the fabric came from. I’m pretty sure the nylon and floral knit are from here, and the denim is from here. The black-and-white stripes…probably from here.

Smooth sailing, it wasn’t, but I was able to mutter my motto frequently: it’s not a mistake; it’s a design element. At any rate, bring on the rain. We’re ready!

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Happy Friday + Randomness

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Happy Friday! On Wednesday, after K’s orthodontic appointment, we stopped off at a fabric store to see if they had any orange felt or knit for her requested pumpkin costume. Then she saw that Southwestern style print and immediately changed her mind about the pumpkin. Soon, a maroon fringe ribbon was added along with silver lace. “What do you want me to make?” I asked her. She shrugged and said, “I dunno, some maid-fancy-girl”. Hmmmmmm…..I am awaiting design specs with some trepidation.

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On alliteration:

K: Mama! We’re learning how to come up with nicknames using the first letter of our names. For you, I thought of “Sanae Superglam”. Or, how about this? “Mama Megabucks”?

We laughed heartily at the irony of those nicknames.

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I’m off to have coffee with a friend I haven’t seen in over seven years! She’s in town for just a few days, and I can’t wait to have a good catch up session. I hope you all have a wonderful weekend!

I am so loving
all the giveaway answers
so cool to find out*

*I had this secret theory that a lot of sewing folks would have science/math backgrounds, and I think my theory is holding pretty true! And can I just say that it’s awesome that some of you answered the question just to answer the question even though you already own the book. Thank you, I love getting to know you all better!

 

Fall Cleaning Giveaway: Part 3 [CLOSED]

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This is such a great book. A great, great book. And the two patterns that immediately drew me in were first, the dress on the left:

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And next, the giant bow top:

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Herein lies the problem. I am simply not a giant bow kind of gal and quite frankly, I think I can self-draft that other dress. And as I looked through the book carefully, I realized that none of the clothes really felt right for me. I was drawn to the photography, and there must have been a part of me that wanted to be more “feminine” as the title promises. Chances are, however, that I will end up squirming with discomfort in the clothes. I’ve been doing this a lot for the last couple of years — asking the question, “does this feel right?”

So, as part of my fall cleaning/purging I am offering up this gem of a book for someone who can actually strut the pretty clothes in a way that I never will. And bonus: the book is in English!

Now, for the question, I was thinking back to my university days. I initially started out as a Mass Communications major with a minor in Business. Initially is the operative word here. The Mass Comm program was, at the time, an incredibly competitive and selective major that required an extensive essay for entry. It was essentially Journalism school, and being that my college was in Los Angeles, there was a prominent media/broadcast journalism component to it and was regarded as one of the top programs in the nation. Long story short, I got in. And then I found out two of my roommates got in as well (the third roommate was a math major and scoffed at all Liberal Arts). I’ve talked before about my reluctance to compete with people I know and this put me in a quandary. As silly as it sounds, I did not want to be in direct rivalry with my roommates, so I decided to switch to the lesser known and quite openly mocked Interpersonal Communications major. When you’re 18, you make decisions like that. The course load for Interpersonal Comm heavily incorporated Psychology, Sociology, Philosophy as well as core Mass Communication classes.

I remember thinking, “Dude,” (remember, I was 18) “what have I done?” At the helm of my first day of the required class stood the professor: she of a beehived coiff, pince-nez and a bristling energy that you could sense yards away. She handed out multi-colored packets with a child-like drawing of  – I don’t even know what it was — something on the cover. The packet contained sheets and sheets of daily exercises with questions like “What did you dream last night?” and “If you couldn’t fail, what would you do?” and “Name three strengths and three weaknesses that you’ve never told anyone. Why don’t you tell people?” Some of it was way out there and beyond wacky, something like “If you could be an alien, what kind would you be?” More child-like illustrations accompanied each sheet along with lots of stars and curlycues. I listened skeptically as she listed her credentials from MIT and described her stint at NASA. That seemed to explain the alien part. And I eventually figured out that the packet was meant to help me explore parts of myself that I would never openly discuss. The idea being that you couldn’t truly connect or relate to other people unless you knew yourself.

I obediently worked on the sheets since I’ve always been a good student and attended all the other requisite communication classes. Meanwhile, I was taking Micro and Macro economics and Finance/Accounting for my Business minor. Which I hated. I quickly sussed out that I was doomed when it came to any business aspirations.

And secretly, I loved my Interpersonal Communications courses. The major was so ridiculed among my peers that I had to put up a front that I too found it a waste of time, but in actuality, I discovered that what I was and still am deeply interested in is interpersonal relationships. And multi-disciplined learning. So although I ended up with a Business minor (a mystery, since I stopped taking the required classes but my academic advisor told me I qualified), I took so many education courses that I should have had an Education minor.

I’ve read that people rarely end up pursuing careers directly in their field of studies. I meandered a lot too, but I was thinking of how I have consistently utilized an overwhelming number of the lessons learned from my classes in my scattershot career — this, I think, is the point of a Liberal Arts degree and I don’t think it’s ever a waste of time to study what you love. It will inevitably prepare you for a variety of opportunities. And obviously, that weird packet from Interpersonal Communications 101 or what-have-you has unconsciously become my source for these giveaway questions. Vital life skills, wouldn’t you say? But back when I went to college, it only cost $3000 a year and I could justify (at least to myself) that I could study anything I wanted. I worked and paid my way through school, but I worry that K will have a far more difficult time when the question of higher education comes up; I have no idea if we’ll be able to save enough money for what is bound to be an astronomical amount for university costs in 2025, and I don’t know if it’s even feasible for students to pay their way through college anymore unless they have Warren Buffet-esque investment skills.

But that’s a subject for another time, and my giveaway question is this: not what kind of alien would you be, but what did you study in college/university? Or perhaps a better question is, what was your favorite subject in school? It could be from university, high school, preschool, whatever.

I will keep the giveaway open until next Thursday, October 9th and will announce the winner the next day and yes to international folks. Good luck!

 

Monday Outfit: The Classic Combo

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Good morning! I walked three miles yesterday for K’s school fundraising event and now I’m hobbling all over the place. Very out of shape. My fitness level is neither here nor there, and today, I have a semi-homerun of an outfit. Clearly, I’m not a baseball fan. Would that actually be a three-baser? A foul? Who cares, right?

I’m back on track with my goal of sewing through this lovely book. This weekend I tackled the “boat neck cut sew” (cut sew is how the Japanese refer to knits) and a pair of pleated pants. Yes, pleated pants. This might be too much of a generalization, but I think someone of K’s size and svelteness is the only type of person who can get away with this style.

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This top was only half successful. I was an obedient rule-follower at first and ironed on some knit stay tape (I cut this up into 3/8″ strips). But only on the front piece around the neckline and arm/sleeve curves. I have no real explanation for why I didn’t do the back, but it proved to be a good lesson because the front neckline looks great, but the back is completely stretched out and fugly.

classic-combo7Well, I guess this isn’t such a helpful reference. Don’t you love the pose, though?

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I used this super thin knit jersey that turned out to be quite see through, which is why K is wearing a tank underneath and rocking the 80s Flashdance look. The stripes may appear to be black and white, but the colors are actually more in the natural/charcoal family. This is very much a K ensemble.

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The pants had all sorts of interesting details and was extremely fun to construct. There were plenty of unexpected elements like the funky pant piece with the pocket already attached and a new-to-me method of attaching the yoke. The front and back pockets make these pants look high-end and those little button loops are très cool. However, I forgot to sew on buttons! Ah well, that’ll be fixed some time in the next year I hope. I apologize that I didn’t put too much effort to get the color correction consistent with these pants. For some reason, the color shifted depending on which angle I shot the pants. The photos of K modeling the pants are closest to the actual color — Essex yarn-dyed linen of course.

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classic-combo8As you can see, a lot of dancing happened and we all know that means only one thing: she loves this outfit.

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And you know, though I didn’t execute as well as I’d hoped, I love it too. Stripes and denim — it’s a classic combo, and you just can’t go wrong with classic combos.

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